Gym Etiquette Staying Safe and Being Considerate

Gym Etiquette
Staying Safe and Being Considerate

You’ve heard of golf etiquette, tennis etiquette, driving etiquette, and social etiquette.  Well, every once in awhile I think it’s helpful to remind everyone of gym etiquette, which is necessary anytime more than one person is working out!  At Fit Studio, because of the “group” nature of our workouts and the many transitions between sets, it’s important to recognize where you are and the space you occupy, relative to the other people on the floor.  That’s also true as you’re entering the gym and beginning your warm-up while the previous group is finishing up.
 
A good rule of thumb is anyone participating in a workout, perhaps transitioning from one set to another, or executing a movement, takes space priority.  This means, if you’re warming up or stretching after your workout, please yield to those who are actually working out.  
 
It’s also important to be aware of your surroundings as you transition from one movement/set to another.  Here are some cringe-worthy, accidents-waiting-to-happen that I’ve seen recently:
 

  1. Walking inches in front of someone swinging a kettle bell.  Eek!  Picture this:  round #5, sweaty hands, heavy kettle bell, struggling to hold on, 40 pounds (or more) leaving your grip….you get the picture.  Make sure you leave plenty of clearance if you walk in front of a swinging kettle bell.  Also, as you place yourself on the floor to do your own kettle bell swings, please stagger yourself a bit to the side of the person in front of you.

 

  1. Doing push-ups or sit-ups almost under the pull-up bar.  Especially when pull-ups are part of the workout, this is a bad position to be in.  If you’re doing the push-ups or sit-ups, you are preventing someone from using that space on the pull-up bar.  Also, the person doing the pull-ups needs to get down off the bar eventually – please give them some space to do so!

 

  1. Walking diagonally across the turf while people are doing lunges, farmer’s carries, sled pushes, etc.  The “diagonal walker” is trying to take the most efficient path to the end of the turf to start their own lunges, or leaving the turf to get to the rowers or tread mills.  But in doing so, they’re walking in front of someone trying to execute a movement using potentially heavy weights (loaded lunges, farmer’s carries, etc.). This is simply unsafe.  Please take the long way around and walk on the black floor to the end of the turf.  Or walk straight from the turf at a right angle to the black floor to exit.

 

  1. Walking inches in front of, or behind, someone jumping rope.  This is a good way to get smacked with a rubber or plastic rope and get a good welt somewhere on your body.  Plus it's annoying to finally string together a few double-unders, only to be hindered by someone who's not paying attention.  Please be aware of where you’re walking and give some good clearance around someone jumping rope.   

 
You can probably see a pattern here, and these are just a few of the things I see going on.  I do understand that sometimes we’re “out of it” – gasping for air as we move to the next set, so we’re not always as aware of our surroundings as we should be.  I get that.  Just collapsing on the floor after a workout and wanting to commiserate with your fellow gym-goers – I get that too.  Think about staying in your lane or pulling over to the side of the road, as you would while driving.  It’s a good way to think about how to move through the gym and make it possible for everyone to have a good workout and stay safe.