Fitness Fads of 2016

Fitness Fads of 2016
 

It’s nothing new, and, in fact, it’s become more frequent.  As the fitness industry grows, so grow the fads – the “innovations” as some may call them.  It’s great that people are making time to keep themselves in shape.  However, the ways some people are doing it are downright funny. 
 
I came across this write-up in in Shape magazine (yes, sometimes I read Shape) about fitness “trends” in 2016: 
 
http://www.shape.com/fitness/trends/15-next-big-fitness-trends
 
After I got done reading about them, I went to the gym and kissed the floor and hugged every barbell and medicine ball in the place.  The article covers everything from a new class called Pound (https://poundfit.com/) where you’re given a couple of drum sticks and then taken through a routine that involves tapping the light-weight drum sticks to the beat of the music. There is also Animal Flow(http://www.animalflow.com/), the new group training sensation in NYC.  Think lion tracking prey. 
I’m trying hard not to laugh while I do my duty to help you sort through what’s effective and worth your time and money.  Fitness fads come and go, and that never surprises me anymore, but true innovations rarely occur.  Fads are like “fruit strips” or “gummy fruits”.  Just because it says “fruit” doesn’t mean it’s good for you, since the “fruit” is about 10% of the whole.  Dipping an apple in caramel, chocolate, and fudge just so you can eat the apple for the fiber, doesn’t mean it’s good for you. 
 
I am a firm believer in the squat, kettle bell swing, sprints, and 30-second rowing intervals.  These movements aren’t candy-coated, but they will get you fit and keep you healthy.  There are no drum sticks or tiger-crouching crawls to choreographed music while you’re doing push-ups and box jumps at Fit, but there is something magic about getting your first pull up, or completing a truck-load of burpees while racing against a clock. 
Sometimes simple is better.  The basic foundational movements are the most effective.  They’ve been around long enough to pass the test of time.  It’s the coaching and the community that makes the training special – not the latest fitness fad like “pole workouts”.
 
There was one piece of the article I did like.  One of the new fads discussed is “team training”.  Wow!  What does it take to be a “fad”?  How old does something have to be?  I would argue that team training has been around since the beginning of sport.  The idea of camaraderie and competition is a motivator (see my post on the Kohler effect of motivation), and if that’s the case, then we are onto something…granted, we’ve been onto it for years.
 
Do you participate in a fitness fad?  Do you have questions about a fad you’ve heard about?  If you do, tell me about it.